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revision 43 by nigel, Sat Feb 24 21:39:21 2007 UTC revision 49 by nigel, Sat Feb 24 21:39:33 2007 UTC
# Line 44  pcre - Perl-compatible regular expressio Line 44  pcre - Perl-compatible regular expressio
44  .B int *\fIovector\fR, int \fIstringcount\fR, "const char ***\fIlistptr\fR);"  .B int *\fIovector\fR, int \fIstringcount\fR, "const char ***\fIlistptr\fR);"
45  .PP  .PP
46  .br  .br
47    .B void pcre_free_substring(const char *\fIstringptr\fR);
48    .PP
49    .br
50    .B void pcre_free_substring_list(const char **\fIstringptr\fR);
51    .PP
52    .br
53  .B const unsigned char *pcre_maketables(void);  .B const unsigned char *pcre_maketables(void);
54  .PP  .PP
55  .br  .br
# Line 70  pcre - Perl-compatible regular expressio Line 76  pcre - Perl-compatible regular expressio
76  The PCRE library is a set of functions that implement regular expression  The PCRE library is a set of functions that implement regular expression
77  pattern matching using the same syntax and semantics as Perl 5, with just a few  pattern matching using the same syntax and semantics as Perl 5, with just a few
78  differences (see below). The current implementation corresponds to Perl 5.005,  differences (see below). The current implementation corresponds to Perl 5.005,
79  with some additional features from the Perl development release.  with some additional features from later versions. This includes some
80    experimental, incomplete support for UTF-8 encoded strings. Details of exactly
81    what is and what is not supported are given below.
82    
83  PCRE has its own native API, which is described in this document. There is also  PCRE has its own native API, which is described in this document. There is also
84  a set of wrapper functions that correspond to the POSIX regular expression API.  a set of wrapper functions that correspond to the POSIX regular expression API.
# Line 84  contain the major and minor release numb Line 92  contain the major and minor release numb
92  use these to include support for different releases.  use these to include support for different releases.
93    
94  The functions \fBpcre_compile()\fR, \fBpcre_study()\fR, and \fBpcre_exec()\fR  The functions \fBpcre_compile()\fR, \fBpcre_study()\fR, and \fBpcre_exec()\fR
95  are used for compiling and matching regular expressions, while  are used for compiling and matching regular expressions.
96  \fBpcre_copy_substring()\fR, \fBpcre_get_substring()\fR, and  
97    The functions \fBpcre_copy_substring()\fR, \fBpcre_get_substring()\fR, and
98  \fBpcre_get_substring_list()\fR are convenience functions for extracting  \fBpcre_get_substring_list()\fR are convenience functions for extracting
99  captured substrings from a matched subject string. The function  captured substrings from a matched subject string; \fBpcre_free_substring()\fR
100  \fBpcre_maketables()\fR is used (optionally) to build a set of character tables  and \fBpcre_free_substring_list()\fR are also provided, to free the memory used
101  in the current locale for passing to \fBpcre_compile()\fR.  for extracted strings.
102    
103    The function \fBpcre_maketables()\fR is used (optionally) to build a set of
104    character tables in the current locale for passing to \fBpcre_compile()\fR.
105    
106  The function \fBpcre_fullinfo()\fR is used to find out information about a  The function \fBpcre_fullinfo()\fR is used to find out information about a
107  compiled pattern; \fBpcre_info()\fR is an obsolete version which returns only  compiled pattern; \fBpcre_info()\fR is an obsolete version which returns only
# Line 223  This option inverts the "greediness" of Line 235  This option inverts the "greediness" of
235  greedy by default, but become greedy if followed by "?". It is not compatible  greedy by default, but become greedy if followed by "?". It is not compatible
236  with Perl. It can also be set by a (?U) option setting within the pattern.  with Perl. It can also be set by a (?U) option setting within the pattern.
237    
238      PCRE_UTF8
239    
240    This option causes PCRE to regard both the pattern and the subject as strings
241    of UTF-8 characters instead of just byte strings. However, it is available only
242    if PCRE has been built to include UTF-8 support. If not, the use of this option
243    provokes an error. Support for UTF-8 is new, experimental, and incomplete.
244    Details of exactly what it entails are given below.
245    
246    
247  .SH STUDYING A PATTERN  .SH STUDYING A PATTERN
248  When a pattern is going to be used several times, it is worth spending more  When a pattern is going to be used several times, it is worth spending more
# Line 323  no back references. Line 343  no back references.
343    
344  Return information about the first character of any matched string, for a  Return information about the first character of any matched string, for a
345  non-anchored pattern. If there is a fixed first character, e.g. from a pattern  non-anchored pattern. If there is a fixed first character, e.g. from a pattern
346  such as (cat|cow|coyote), then it is returned in the integer pointed to by  such as (cat|cow|coyote), it is returned in the integer pointed to by
347  \fIwhere\fR. Otherwise, if either  \fIwhere\fR. Otherwise, if either
348    
349  (a) the pattern was compiled with the PCRE_MULTILINE option, and every branch  (a) the pattern was compiled with the PCRE_MULTILINE option, and every branch
# Line 332  starts with "^", or Line 352  starts with "^", or
352  (b) every branch of the pattern starts with ".*" and PCRE_DOTALL is not set  (b) every branch of the pattern starts with ".*" and PCRE_DOTALL is not set
353  (if it were set, the pattern would be anchored),  (if it were set, the pattern would be anchored),
354    
355  then -1 is returned, indicating that the pattern matches only at the  -1 is returned, indicating that the pattern matches only at the start of a
356  start of a subject string or after any "\\n" within the string. Otherwise -2 is  subject string or after any "\\n" within the string. Otherwise -2 is returned.
357  returned. For anchored patterns, -2 is returned.  For anchored patterns, -2 is returned.
358    
359    PCRE_INFO_FIRSTTABLE    PCRE_INFO_FIRSTTABLE
360    
# Line 550  is a pointer to the vector of integer of Line 570  is a pointer to the vector of integer of
570  were captured by the match, including the substring that matched the entire  were captured by the match, including the substring that matched the entire
571  regular expression. This is the value returned by \fBpcre_exec\fR if it  regular expression. This is the value returned by \fBpcre_exec\fR if it
572  is greater than zero. If \fBpcre_exec()\fR returned zero, indicating that it  is greater than zero. If \fBpcre_exec()\fR returned zero, indicating that it
573  ran out of space in \fIovector\fR, then the value passed as  ran out of space in \fIovector\fR, the value passed as \fIstringcount\fR should
574  \fIstringcount\fR should be the size of the vector divided by three.  be the size of the vector divided by three.
575    
576  The functions \fBpcre_copy_substring()\fR and \fBpcre_get_substring()\fR  The functions \fBpcre_copy_substring()\fR and \fBpcre_get_substring()\fR
577  extract a single substring, whose number is given as \fIstringnumber\fR. A  extract a single substring, whose number is given as \fIstringnumber\fR. A
578  value of zero extracts the substring that matched the entire pattern, while  value of zero extracts the substring that matched the entire pattern, while
579  higher values extract the captured substrings. For \fBpcre_copy_substring()\fR,  higher values extract the captured substrings. For \fBpcre_copy_substring()\fR,
580  the string is placed in \fIbuffer\fR, whose length is given by  the string is placed in \fIbuffer\fR, whose length is given by
581  \fIbuffersize\fR, while for \fBpcre_get_substring()\fR a new block of store is  \fIbuffersize\fR, while for \fBpcre_get_substring()\fR a new block of memory is
582  obtained via \fBpcre_malloc\fR, and its address is returned via  obtained via \fBpcre_malloc\fR, and its address is returned via
583  \fIstringptr\fR. The yield of the function is the length of the string, not  \fIstringptr\fR. The yield of the function is the length of the string, not
584  including the terminating zero, or one of  including the terminating zero, or one of
# Line 590  string. This can be distinguished from a Line 610  string. This can be distinguished from a
610  inspecting the appropriate offset in \fIovector\fR, which is negative for unset  inspecting the appropriate offset in \fIovector\fR, which is negative for unset
611  substrings.  substrings.
612    
613    The two convenience functions \fBpcre_free_substring()\fR and
614    \fBpcre_free_substring_list()\fR can be used to free the memory returned by
615    a previous call of \fBpcre_get_substring()\fR or
616    \fBpcre_get_substring_list()\fR, respectively. They do nothing more than call
617    the function pointed to by \fBpcre_free\fR, which of course could be called
618    directly from a C program. However, PCRE is used in some situations where it is
619    linked via a special interface to another programming language which cannot use
620    \fBpcre_free\fR directly; it is for these cases that the functions are
621    provided.
622    
623    
624  .SH LIMITATIONS  .SH LIMITATIONS
# Line 650  patterns using the non-Perl item (?R). Line 679  patterns using the non-Perl item (?R).
679  with the settings of captured strings when part of a pattern is repeated. For  with the settings of captured strings when part of a pattern is repeated. For
680  example, matching "aba" against the pattern /^(a(b)?)+$/ sets $2 to the value  example, matching "aba" against the pattern /^(a(b)?)+$/ sets $2 to the value
681  "b", but matching "aabbaa" against /^(aa(bb)?)+$/ leaves $2 unset. However, if  "b", but matching "aabbaa" against /^(aa(bb)?)+$/ leaves $2 unset. However, if
682  the pattern is changed to /^(aa(b(b))?)+$/ then $2 (and $3) get set.  the pattern is changed to /^(aa(b(b))?)+$/ then $2 (and $3) are set.
683    
684  In Perl 5.004 $2 is set in both cases, and that is also true of PCRE. If in the  In Perl 5.004 $2 is set in both cases, and that is also true of PCRE. If in the
685  future Perl changes to a consistent state that is different, PCRE may change to  future Perl changes to a consistent state that is different, PCRE may change to
# Line 691  The syntax and semantics of the regular Line 720  The syntax and semantics of the regular
720  described below. Regular expressions are also described in the Perl  described below. Regular expressions are also described in the Perl
721  documentation and in a number of other books, some of which have copious  documentation and in a number of other books, some of which have copious
722  examples. Jeffrey Friedl's "Mastering Regular Expressions", published by  examples. Jeffrey Friedl's "Mastering Regular Expressions", published by
723  O'Reilly (ISBN 1-56592-257), covers them in great detail. The description  O'Reilly (ISBN 1-56592-257), covers them in great detail.
724  here is intended as reference documentation.  
725    The description here is intended as reference documentation. The basic
726    operation of PCRE is on strings of bytes. However, there is the beginnings of
727    some support for UTF-8 character strings. To use this support you must
728    configure PCRE to include it, and then call \fBpcre_compile()\fR with the
729    PCRE_UTF8 option. How this affects the pattern matching is described in the
730    final section of this document.
731    
732  A regular expression is a pattern that is matched against a subject string from  A regular expression is a pattern that is matched against a subject string from
733  left to right. Most characters stand for themselves in a pattern, and match the  left to right. Most characters stand for themselves in a pattern, and match the
# Line 920  end of the subject in both modes, and if Line 955  end of the subject in both modes, and if
955  .SH FULL STOP (PERIOD, DOT)  .SH FULL STOP (PERIOD, DOT)
956  Outside a character class, a dot in the pattern matches any one character in  Outside a character class, a dot in the pattern matches any one character in
957  the subject, including a non-printing character, but not (by default) newline.  the subject, including a non-printing character, but not (by default) newline.
958  If the PCRE_DOTALL option is set, then dots match newlines as well. The  If the PCRE_DOTALL option is set, dots match newlines as well. The handling of
959  handling of dot is entirely independent of the handling of circumflex and  dot is entirely independent of the handling of circumflex and dollar, the only
960  dollar, the only relationship being that they both involve newline characters.  relationship being that they both involve newline characters. Dot has no
961  Dot has no special meaning in a character class.  special meaning in a character class.
962    
963    
964  .SH SQUARE BRACKETS  .SH SQUARE BRACKETS
# Line 1213  to the string Line 1248  to the string
1248  fails, because it matches the entire string due to the greediness of the .*  fails, because it matches the entire string due to the greediness of the .*
1249  item.  item.
1250    
1251  However, if a quantifier is followed by a question mark, then it ceases to be  However, if a quantifier is followed by a question mark, it ceases to be
1252  greedy, and instead matches the minimum number of times possible, so the  greedy, and instead matches the minimum number of times possible, so the
1253  pattern  pattern
1254    
# Line 1229  own right. Because it has two uses, it c Line 1264  own right. Because it has two uses, it c
1264  which matches one digit by preference, but can match two if that is the only  which matches one digit by preference, but can match two if that is the only
1265  way the rest of the pattern matches.  way the rest of the pattern matches.
1266    
1267  If the PCRE_UNGREEDY option is set (an option which is not available in Perl)  If the PCRE_UNGREEDY option is set (an option which is not available in Perl),
1268  then the quantifiers are not greedy by default, but individual ones can be made  the quantifiers are not greedy by default, but individual ones can be made
1269  greedy by following them with a question mark. In other words, it inverts the  greedy by following them with a question mark. In other words, it inverts the
1270  default behaviour.  default behaviour.
1271    
# Line 1239  is greater than 1 or with a limited maxi Line 1274  is greater than 1 or with a limited maxi
1274  compiled pattern, in proportion to the size of the minimum or maximum.  compiled pattern, in proportion to the size of the minimum or maximum.
1275    
1276  If a pattern starts with .* or .{0,} and the PCRE_DOTALL option (equivalent  If a pattern starts with .* or .{0,} and the PCRE_DOTALL option (equivalent
1277  to Perl's /s) is set, thus allowing the . to match newlines, then the pattern  to Perl's /s) is set, thus allowing the . to match newlines, the pattern is
1278  is implicitly anchored, because whatever follows will be tried against every  implicitly anchored, because whatever follows will be tried against every
1279  character position in the subject string, so there is no point in retrying the  character position in the subject string, so there is no point in retrying the
1280  overall match at any position after the first. PCRE treats such a pattern as  overall match at any position after the first. PCRE treats such a pattern as
1281  though it were preceded by \\A. In cases where it is known that the subject  though it were preceded by \\A. In cases where it is known that the subject
# Line 1284  itself. So the pattern Line 1319  itself. So the pattern
1319    
1320  matches "sense and sensibility" and "response and responsibility", but not  matches "sense and sensibility" and "response and responsibility", but not
1321  "sense and responsibility". If caseful matching is in force at the time of the  "sense and responsibility". If caseful matching is in force at the time of the
1322  back reference, then the case of letters is relevant. For example,  back reference, the case of letters is relevant. For example,
1323    
1324    ((?i)rah)\\s+\\1    ((?i)rah)\\s+\\1
1325    
# Line 1292  matches "rah rah" and "RAH RAH", but not Line 1327  matches "rah rah" and "RAH RAH", but not
1327  capturing subpattern is matched caselessly.  capturing subpattern is matched caselessly.
1328    
1329  There may be more than one back reference to the same subpattern. If a  There may be more than one back reference to the same subpattern. If a
1330  subpattern has not actually been used in a particular match, then any back  subpattern has not actually been used in a particular match, any back
1331  references to it always fail. For example, the pattern  references to it always fail. For example, the pattern
1332    
1333    (a|(bc))\\2    (a|(bc))\\2
# Line 1300  references to it always fail. For exampl Line 1335  references to it always fail. For exampl
1335  always fails if it starts to match "a" rather than "bc". Because there may be  always fails if it starts to match "a" rather than "bc". Because there may be
1336  up to 99 back references, all digits following the backslash are taken  up to 99 back references, all digits following the backslash are taken
1337  as part of a potential back reference number. If the pattern continues with a  as part of a potential back reference number. If the pattern continues with a
1338  digit character, then some delimiter must be used to terminate the back  digit character, some delimiter must be used to terminate the back reference.
1339  reference. If the PCRE_EXTENDED option is set, this can be whitespace.  If the PCRE_EXTENDED option is set, this can be whitespace. Otherwise an empty
1340  Otherwise an empty comment can be used.  comment can be used.
1341    
1342  A back reference that occurs inside the parentheses to which it refers fails  A back reference that occurs inside the parentheses to which it refers fails
1343  when the subpattern is first used, so, for example, (a\\1) never matches.  when the subpattern is first used, so, for example, (a\\1) never matches.
# Line 1311  example, the pattern Line 1346  example, the pattern
1346    
1347    (a|b\\1)+    (a|b\\1)+
1348    
1349  matches any number of "a"s and also "aba", "ababaa" etc. At each iteration of  matches any number of "a"s and also "aba", "ababbaa" etc. At each iteration of
1350  the subpattern, the back reference matches the character string corresponding  the subpattern, the back reference matches the character string corresponding
1351  to the previous iteration. In order for this to work, the pattern must be such  to the previous iteration. In order for this to work, the pattern must be such
1352  that the first iteration does not need to match the back reference. This can be  that the first iteration does not need to match the back reference. This can be
# Line 1390  Several assertions (of any sort) may occ Line 1425  Several assertions (of any sort) may occ
1425  matches "foo" preceded by three digits that are not "999". Notice that each of  matches "foo" preceded by three digits that are not "999". Notice that each of
1426  the assertions is applied independently at the same point in the subject  the assertions is applied independently at the same point in the subject
1427  string. First there is a check that the previous three characters are all  string. First there is a check that the previous three characters are all
1428  digits, then there is a check that the same three characters are not "999".  digits, and then there is a check that the same three characters are not "999".
1429  This pattern does \fInot\fR match "foo" preceded by six characters, the first  This pattern does \fInot\fR match "foo" preceded by six characters, the first
1430  of which are digits and the last three of which are not "999". For example, it  of which are digits and the last three of which are not "999". For example, it
1431  doesn't match "123abcfoo". A pattern to do that is  doesn't match "123abcfoo". A pattern to do that is
# Line 1475  what follows matches the rest of the pat Line 1510  what follows matches the rest of the pat
1510    
1511    ^.*abcd$    ^.*abcd$
1512    
1513  then the initial .* matches the entire string at first, but when this fails  the initial .* matches the entire string at first, but when this fails (because
1514  (because there is no following "a"), it backtracks to match all but the last  there is no following "a"), it backtracks to match all but the last character,
1515  character, then all but the last two characters, and so on. Once again the  then all but the last two characters, and so on. Once again the search for "a"
1516  search for "a" covers the entire string, from right to left, so we are no  covers the entire string, from right to left, so we are no better off. However,
1517  better off. However, if the pattern is written as  if the pattern is written as
1518    
1519    ^(?>.*)(?<=abcd)    ^(?>.*)(?<=abcd)
1520    
1521  then there can be no backtracking for the .* item; it can match only the entire  there can be no backtracking for the .* item; it can match only the entire
1522  string. The subsequent lookbehind assertion does a single test on the last four  string. The subsequent lookbehind assertion does a single test on the last four
1523  characters. If it fails, the match fails immediately. For long strings, this  characters. If it fails, the match fails immediately. For long strings, this
1524  approach makes a significant difference to the processing time.  approach makes a significant difference to the processing time.
# Line 1528  no-pattern (if present) is used. If ther Line 1563  no-pattern (if present) is used. If ther
1563  subpattern, a compile-time error occurs.  subpattern, a compile-time error occurs.
1564    
1565  There are two kinds of condition. If the text between the parentheses consists  There are two kinds of condition. If the text between the parentheses consists
1566  of a sequence of digits, then the condition is satisfied if the capturing  of a sequence of digits, the condition is satisfied if the capturing subpattern
1567  subpattern of that number has previously matched. Consider the following  of that number has previously matched. Consider the following pattern, which
1568  pattern, which contains non-significant white space to make it more readable  contains non-significant white space to make it more readable (assume the
1569  (assume the PCRE_EXTENDED option) and to divide it into three parts for ease  PCRE_EXTENDED option) and to divide it into three parts for ease of discussion:
 of discussion:  
1570    
1571    ( \\( )?    [^()]+    (?(1) \\) )    ( \\( )?    [^()]+    (?(1) \\) )
1572    
# Line 1622  on at the top level. If additional paren Line 1656  on at the top level. If additional paren
1656    \\( ( ( (?>[^()]+) | (?R) )* ) \\)    \\( ( ( (?>[^()]+) | (?R) )* ) \\)
1657       ^                        ^       ^                        ^
1658       ^                        ^       ^                        ^
1659  then the string they capture is "ab(cd)ef", the contents of the top level  the string they capture is "ab(cd)ef", the contents of the top level
1660  parentheses. If there are more than 15 capturing parentheses in a pattern, PCRE  parentheses. If there are more than 15 capturing parentheses in a pattern, PCRE
1661  has to obtain extra memory to store data during a recursion, which it does by  has to obtain extra memory to store data during a recursion, which it does by
1662  using \fBpcre_malloc\fR, freeing it via \fBpcre_free\fR afterwards. If no  using \fBpcre_malloc\fR, freeing it via \fBpcre_free\fR afterwards. If no
# Line 1686  with the pattern above. The former gives Line 1720  with the pattern above. The former gives
1720  applied to a whole line of "a" characters, whereas the latter takes an  applied to a whole line of "a" characters, whereas the latter takes an
1721  appreciable time with strings longer than about 20 characters.  appreciable time with strings longer than about 20 characters.
1722    
1723    
1724    .SH UTF-8 SUPPORT
1725    Starting at release 3.3, PCRE has some support for character strings encoded
1726    in the UTF-8 format. This is incomplete, and is regarded as experimental. In
1727    order to use it, you must configure PCRE to include UTF-8 support in the code,
1728    and, in addition, you must call \fBpcre_compile()\fR with the PCRE_UTF8 option
1729    flag. When you do this, both the pattern and any subject strings that are
1730    matched against it are treated as UTF-8 strings instead of just strings of
1731    bytes, but only in the cases that are mentioned below.
1732    
1733    If you compile PCRE with UTF-8 support, but do not use it at run time, the
1734    library will be a bit bigger, but the additional run time overhead is limited
1735    to testing the PCRE_UTF8 flag in several places, so should not be very large.
1736    
1737    PCRE assumes that the strings it is given contain valid UTF-8 codes. It does
1738    not diagnose invalid UTF-8 strings. If you pass invalid UTF-8 strings to PCRE,
1739    the results are undefined.
1740    
1741    Running with PCRE_UTF8 set causes these changes in the way PCRE works:
1742    
1743    1. In a pattern, the escape sequence \\x{...}, where the contents of the braces
1744    is a string of hexadecimal digits, is interpreted as a UTF-8 character whose
1745    code number is the given hexadecimal number, for example: \\x{1234}. This
1746    inserts from one to six literal bytes into the pattern, using the UTF-8
1747    encoding. If a non-hexadecimal digit appears between the braces, the item is
1748    not recognized.
1749    
1750    2. The original hexadecimal escape sequence, \\xhh, generates a two-byte UTF-8
1751    character if its value is greater than 127.
1752    
1753    3. Repeat quantifiers are NOT correctly handled if they follow a multibyte
1754    character. For example, \\x{100}* and \\xc3+ do not work. If you want to
1755    repeat such characters, you must enclose them in non-capturing parentheses,
1756    for example (?:\\x{100}), at present.
1757    
1758    4. The dot metacharacter matches one UTF-8 character instead of a single byte.
1759    
1760    5. Unlike literal UTF-8 characters, the dot metacharacter followed by a
1761    repeat quantifier does operate correctly on UTF-8 characters instead of
1762    single bytes.
1763    
1764    4. Although the \\x{...} escape is permitted in a character class, characters
1765    whose values are greater than 255 cannot be included in a class.
1766    
1767    5. A class is matched against a UTF-8 character instead of just a single byte,
1768    but it can match only characters whose values are less than 256. Characters
1769    with greater values always fail to match a class.
1770    
1771    6. Repeated classes work correctly on multiple characters.
1772    
1773    7. Classes containing just a single character whose value is greater than 127
1774    (but less than 256), for example, [\\x80] or [^\\x{93}], do not work because
1775    these are optimized into single byte matches. In the first case, of course,
1776    the class brackets are just redundant.
1777    
1778    8. Lookbehind assertions move backwards in the subject by a fixed number of
1779    characters instead of a fixed number of bytes. Simple cases have been tested
1780    to work correctly, but there may be hidden gotchas herein.
1781    
1782    9. The character types such as \\d and \\w do not work correctly with UTF-8
1783    characters. They continue to test a single byte.
1784    
1785    10. Anything not explicitly mentioned here continues to work in bytes rather
1786    than in characters.
1787    
1788    The following UTF-8 features of Perl 5.6 are not implemented:
1789    
1790    1. The escape sequence \\C to match a single byte.
1791    
1792    2. The use of Unicode tables and properties and escapes \\p, \\P, and \\X.
1793    
1794  .SH AUTHOR  .SH AUTHOR
1795  Philip Hazel <ph10@cam.ac.uk>  Philip Hazel <ph10@cam.ac.uk>
1796  .br  .br
# Line 1697  Cambridge CB2 3QG, England. Line 1802  Cambridge CB2 3QG, England.
1802  .br  .br
1803  Phone: +44 1223 334714  Phone: +44 1223 334714
1804    
1805  Last updated: 27 January 2000  Last updated: 28 August 2000,
1806    .br
1807      the 250th anniversary of the death of J.S. Bach.
1808  .br  .br
1809  Copyright (c) 1997-2000 University of Cambridge.  Copyright (c) 1997-2000 University of Cambridge.

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